vitamins, alternative medicine, antioxidants

Vitamin Stuff Blog

A Health, Nutrition, and Alternative Medicine Blog

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Weight Loss Surgery Eradicates Diabetes Symptoms

Written by Tena Moore

A new study, presented at the International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders in Paris, has found that bariatric surgery for weight loss can also help eradicate diabetes type 2 symptoms. Bariatric surgery (aka, gastric-band operation) is a weight loss surgery where a staple or band is fitted around the upper part of the stomach to shrink the stomach and decrease appetite. Bariatric surgery can be gastric bypass.

The study was led by Professor Henry Buchwald from the Department of Surgery at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and involved a medical research review of 135,000 patients. The study proved that bariatric surgery helps to eliminate diabetes type 2 symptoms: 78 percent of the participants had a ‘complete resolution’ of their diabetes for up to two years after bariatric surgery. Eight-seven percent saw an improvement in their diabetes or a ‘complete resolution’. This makes sense to researchers, since type 2 diabetes is most often caused by obesity. Once the weight is lost and health resumes to the body, diabetes caused by obesity disappears.

Bariatric surgery is a last resort for those who cannot lose weight by other means. Patients must have a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or over and prove serious weight loss failure. Most people that have the surgery lose around 50 percent of their excess weight.

Although this seems like the perfect solution to obesity and diabetes for some, it is not for everyone. Even when patients have bariatric surgery, they must eat a healthy, balanced diet and get plenty of exercise or they can gain weight back. In addition, there are certain risks associated with surgery which must be understood beforehand.



Other Posts

Can linoleic acid reduce the risk of heart disease?
Is Erectile Dysfunction Linked to Heart Attack?
DHEA Levels, Beer, and...erectile dysfunction, arthritis, etc.
Ribose supplements and heart attack
Can drinking tea lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart disease?



Labels: ,







Return to VitaminStuff Homepage:



    Google
      Web www.vitaminstuff.com


Sunday, October 18, 2009

Are Fish Toxins Linked to Diabetes?

Written by Tena Moore

A new study focused on boat captains fishing in the Great Lakes area found a link between DDE and diabetes. DDE is a fat soluble breakdown product of the toxic, synthetic pesticide DDT. DDE hardly ever gets excreted from the body, except through breast milk during nursing. For this reason, it tends to build up in the fat and liver of the body throughout life. Now it may be more than a toxin; it may be a diabetic concern.

The study found that Great Lakes fishermen were more likely to develop diabetes than the general population, and that they also had higher amounts of DDE in their blood. The results were published in Environmental Health Perspectives. The study was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

Why the Great Lakes area? DDT was used for farming in the area before it was banned in the U.S. over 37 years ago. It remains a toxin in the Great Lakes region. Since boat captains tend to eat more fish than other fishermen, they were the best fisherman to test. The boat captains used for the study had been fishing in the area for a minimum of 15 years.

The researchers aren’t sure what the link is between DDE and diabetes, but they are suggesting that people get a wide variety of fish types, from a wide variety of water sources in their diet. Since eating fish is a healthy dietary choice, the researchers do not want to discourage people from eating fish altogether, but simply make them aware that eating too much from the same water source is not the best idea.





Other Posts

Does sugar cause wrinkles?
The difference between Vegetarianism and Veganism?
How good is fish for your diet?
Fish Oil is a healthy source of good fat
Omega 3s raise good cholesterol and lower bad cholesterol



Labels:







Return to VitaminStuff Homepage:



    Google
      Web www.vitaminstuff.com


Monday, January 5, 2009

Can Veganism Cure Diabetes?

Could you eat a vegan diet if it would cure your Type 2 diabetes? Veganism is a healthy diet that involves not only forgoing meat (cow, chicken, fish, turkey and any other living creatures) but it also involves not eating animal products, such as sour cream, cheese, milk, and other animal products such as eggs. While many people still can’t imagine having a diet that does not involve animals, more and more research is pointing the healthy validity of a vegan diet. This time it is being said to help those who suffer with Type 2 diabetes.

The following article gives an overview of a randomized clinical study that proved a vegan diet could improve sensitivity to insulin by improving glycemic and lipid control. This is great news for those with Type 2 diabetes, especially if they feel they could switch to a vegan diet. Of course, this diet wouldn’t work for everyone, but for some it could possibly reverse their diabetes.

Vegan is a Diabetes Cure?

Labels: ,







Return to VitaminStuff Homepage:



    Google
      Web www.vitaminstuff.com


Tuesday, November 18, 2008

What are Legumes?

Legumes are plants that have pods with tiny rows of seeds inside. Beans, peas, lentils and peanuts are all considered legumes. Black beans, black-eyed peas, pinto beans, garbanzo beans, fava beans and kidney beans and all other beans are legumes Split peas, yellow peas, green peas and all lentils are also legumes.

Legumes are extremely healthy. They are low in fat and high in protein, fiber and antioxidants. They contain calcium, folate, zinc, iron and selenium. They also provide a low glycemic index (GI) and may reduce the risk of diabetes, cancer, heart disease and obesity.

Legumes are a rich source of vegetarian protein, offering less fat and more fiber than meat protein sources.

Labels: , , , , ,







Return to VitaminStuff Homepage:



    Google
      Web www.vitaminstuff.com


Monday, November 10, 2008

Black Tea Good for Type 2 Diabetes?

It’s not time to start guzzling black tea by the gallons, but a new study does suggest that it may help prevent type 2 diabetes.

Scientists at Dundee University, along with the Scottish Crop Research Institute, believe that theaflavins and thearubigins in black tea can act as an insulin substitute, because they mimic the action of insulin in the body.

They are definitely not suggesting that it will cure diabetes, but their finding are interesting and more studies will be done to determine the role of black tea in diabetes.

The study was published in Aging Cell.

Labels: , ,







Return to VitaminStuff Homepage:



    Google
      Web www.vitaminstuff.com


Thursday, October 30, 2008

Can that Little Pot Belly Indicate That You’re More Likely to Develop Heart Disease?

Yes, even a small amount of abdominal fat may increase the likelihood of heart disease even in otherwise normal weight individuals. Recently, researchers from the University of Texas published a report in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, which confirmed the fact that waist size rather than overall body weight was a better indicator of heart disease. Researchers in this study based their study on medical tests and imaging scans performed on over two thousand individuals. The results of the testing indicate that women with a waist of thirty-two or larger and men with a waist of thirty seven or greater had a significant risk of heart disease.

The study went on to state that body shape is important. Individuals with the largest waist to hip ratio’s (waist larger than hips) were twice as likely to have the calcium deposits that suggest the onset of Atherosclerosis than those with smaller hip to waist ratios. This body shape also linked with other diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. It appears that abdominal fat secretes inflammatory proteins that add to the atherosclerotic plaque accumulation. Still, other studies indicate that belly fat is more toxic than fat located on other areas of the body such as the hips. Although individuals who are overweight have an increased risk of heart disease, the risk increased if an individual has fat that concentrated around the abdomen. Previous studies have produced the same results as the study done at the University of Texas, consequently it is important for individuals to eat a healthy diet and exercise to prevent the accumulation of belly fat early in life in order to reduce their risks of morbid diseases such a heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,







Return to VitaminStuff Homepage:



    Google
      Web www.vitaminstuff.com
















The Vitamin Stuff Health Nutrition Dictionary








Disclaimer: The information provided here is for informational purposes and is not medical advice. Individuals wishing to use supplements or alternative medicine therapies should consult with their doctor beforehand.

Copyright © 2005 www.vitaminstuff.com